Monday, March 21, 2005

French Food Idioms

Have you noticed how food sometimes ends up in expressions that have nothing to do with it? Like "piece of cake", "apple to apple", "cool as a cucumber", etc. Well, you can imagine that French people, food-centric as they are, have tons of food idioms as well. Some of them are regional, others are used very commonly all over the country; and all are so picturesque!

I thought it would be fun to explain some of them (the cream of the crop!) in this blog, along with pictures and a recipe if possible. Here is the list of previously posted idioms. Click on any of them to get the full explanation!

If you want to share your favorite French or English idioms, please do so! Leave a comment!

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

Très bien, j'ai tout compris, j'ai beaucoup ri.
Maman

Anonymous said...

How do you say "Bob's your uncle" in french?

Estelle said...

Andrew? Is that you? :-)
Well, you could simply say "Et voilà!"

Anonymous said...

could you please tell me what's the name of [Partei] in US?
It's a sort of Gueese liver. You can spread on the bread.
Where I can buy? which gocery store might carry?
Thank you very much.
Julien
indigostate@yahoo.com

Sylvie Manille said...

It is not my cup of tea = je n'aime pas ...

Estelle said...

Sylvie,
Good suggestion: thanks! I should write a post about this one, which can also be translated litteraly: "ce n'est pas ma tasse de thé"...

Julien,
Sorry... I never answered your question. I think you're talking about "paté" (the french name is used as is in the US). You can probably find goose liver paté in gourmet stores...

Jonathan said...

I wonder if they have an equivalent to "so hungry I could eat a horse" :-p

Estelle said...

We would probably say "il a une faim de loup" (he is hungry like a wolf) or "il pourrait avaler un boeuf" (he could swallow/eat a cow).

Petitrobert said...

"La mayonnaise n'a pas pris"....Things didn't work out as planned.

Anonymous said...

In colloquial French:
"Ce ne sont pas tes oignons!" means "It's none of your business"
and
"Occupe-toi de tes oignons!" means "mind your own business."

Thanks for this post. It made me laugh.

~La femme canadienne

Catherine said...

There is also "on va pas en faire un fromage" = We're not going to make a fuss

Cathy
French online